Women in Agriculture in Margibi County, Liberia

Women in Agriculture in Margibi County, Liberia


[MUSIC PLAYING] WOMAN 1: My name is [INAUDIBLE]. We are at the demonstration
site of M.O.A., Margibi County This demonstration
started some 2014. CREW: Nice. WOMAN 1: I took over 2014 June
in Margibi [INAUDIBLE].. Which are cultivated 2 acres of swam rice with more cassava that became very successful [INAUDIBLE],, they go [INAUDIBLE]. To a person, they can
save some [INAUDIBLE].. Like [INAUDIBLE],, they
go extra mile in payment [INAUDIBLE].. MAN 1: Infestation [INAUDIBLE]. WOMAN 1: Infestation. Infestation, birds come
and damage what you have. Yeah, so the different birds that eat rice do come to damage the rice [INAUDIBLE] rice. They come to damage the rice by sucking the milk off the grain [INAUDIBLE] of the grains, in the seeds. So when they suck the milk from
you, the [INAUDIBLE] not the [INAUDIBLE] cream in the–
they were jabbing in there for the infestation. So I did it, also see
[INAUDIBLE] do that. In 2015, I did the same thing. Now for 2016, I never because
I had other obligations. [INAUDIBLE] wish I [INAUDIBLE]
do the [INAUDIBLE].. And they’re looking at cassava
to give less labor intensive. When it comes to management,
I decided to grow cassava. Wish I did, two
[INAUDIBLE] of cassava. Last year I did one
point five [INAUDIBLE],, this year I did two [INAUDIBLE]. And the [INAUDIBLE] of
this [INAUDIBLE] nutrition is to motivate commerce. To get important agriculture,
especially for women. Because working as women,
obligation is [INAUDIBLE].. Women carry the heavy
load in the [INAUDIBLE].. But if children will cry,
uh-uh, mama, I’m hungry. So you, as a women, if you can’t
get a [INAUDIBLE] in farming, you’re children will
grow [INAUDIBLE].. And they’re not
getting their food. And I said, no, we
can buy for what we cook for the child
for the whole year. But not food. Food are everyday necessity. The children have to eat
one or two times a day, or two or three times a day. So if you can’t provide
them one, then [INAUDIBLE] your other one. INTERVIEWER: So now,
as for the Ebola, women important in agriculture
especially, how it benefit [INAUDIBLE] to your family? WOMAN 1: So my family
own this [INAUDIBLE]—- INTERVIEWER: Your family and– WOMAN 1: –my farmers. INTERVIEWER: Yeah,
you’re farmers. So do you have
farmers [INAUDIBLE]?? WOMAN 1: I have farmers. INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 1: I’m controlling
the work and food. INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 1: I’m controlling the
farmers, when they come to– INTERVIEWER:
Especially the women? WOMAN 1: Especially
women and men. INTERVIEWER: Yes. WOMAN 1: But I
encourage the women to be actively important
agricultural as compared to men. Because, you know, our women,
they will say, I’m woman, I’m not supposed to lay down
with a man– sorry to say that– born is children. But for the men, why
should [INAUDIBLE] not so. You have to put
the baby in front. INTERVIEWER: So we need light
now, [INAUDIBLE] farmers. But [INAUDIBLE] Ebola how
to protect this [INAUDIBLE].. WOMAN 1: So we– INTERVIEWER: [INAUDIBLE]. WOMAN 1: Is the punishment
because we have– I have a motor
bike inside there. What is real women? Yeah, you is real women. So I have to [INAUDIBLE]
project community. Wish I didn’t [INAUDIBLE]
women [INAUDIBLE].. And we have [INAUDIBLE],,
I have other in the war. In [INAUDIBLE],, I have
close to 100 farmers it took in all, so
people pass off. So they don’t have
their sons no more. And some people were sick when
I went to the last distribution. With this working farm,
the distribution rise. Only two [INAUDIBLE]. So they get their rice,
they planted their rice. And when we planted
the rice, they say, we couldn’t carry all. And then we turn around,
[INAUDIBLE] the rest is supposed to keep a new
place [INAUDIBLE],, it all. And some had a [INAUDIBLE]
brought in the field. When you and two, three
patrons have some together, and when there’s maybe
one or two persons die and [INAUDIBLE],,
the one is fine. So for that, when I, it
wasn’t the [INAUDIBLE] they find to [INAUDIBLE]. They want to evaluate a person
out of a [INAUDIBLE] it all. Or to build their own,
they want to [INAUDIBLE].. To [INAUDIBLE] our
beans, to grow women. In one [INAUDIBLE]
and other [INAUDIBLE].. But a good vegetable lasts
the whole vegetable season. And now we get the seeds
cassava, [INAUDIBLE] and seed rice. S So now, most of them
are carrying bread, one from [INAUDIBLE],,
and some are waiting. It’s called the [INAUDIBLE]
rice, which is three months. So some people have their
[INAUDIBLE] infestation of [INAUDIBLE]. So for that, if you
lay, it plants it. So that if we have
[INAUDIBLE] who use? [INAUDIBLE] everybody
would be have their thing. So that they can be the
first one [INAUDIBLE].. So now my farmers, my
women, are improving. And just by recent,
last week Wednesday, from Monday to Wednesday
we have training for rural women in the region. Mamas [INAUDIBLE] grandpas
[INAUDIBLE] and my [INAUDIBLE],, we are women with opportunity. So very soon we will do
seed distribution for them to start vegetables. INTERVIEWER: Right. WOMAN 1: So they are getting,
expressing other culture as compared to before. INTERVIEWER: So now, we
ask, looking at the cassava plant, is this the only cassava
plant you’re making it now, or you got different
[INAUDIBLE]?? WOMAN 1: I have different,
different things. We can just look
at it, [INAUDIBLE].. Look at it go. Those I have close to 50. INTERVIEWER: 50? WOMAN 1: Yes. Chicken, but the chicken
own everything I eat. And I plant it. They have good [INAUDIBLE],,
I have [INAUDIBLE].. If you cut– if I
grow the cassava, I have [INAUDIBLE] waiting. Even though we sell some, I
sell the [INAUDIBLE] But I don’t want to– INTERVIEWER: But right now– [INTERPOSING VOICES] WOMAN 1: –I don’t
want those [INAUDIBLE] saying it to other
people, then [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: Right. WOMAN 1: [INAUDIBLE]
ever a husband did, I just divide my portion. I’ve tried [INAUDIBLE]. But [INAUDIBLE],, I
sell it to farmers. If the daughters [INAUDIBLE],,
depending only [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: So what will
happen now if you are not able, right after Ebola, you are
not able to get independent for mass production, how
will be your life if it does? WOMAN 1: Are we not able? INTERVIEWER: If you not able– WOMAN 1: Oh! INTERVIEWER: –to
do this [INAUDIBLE]?? WOMAN 1: Because I
know the risk in it. Because I know the risk in it,
that’s why I’m important in it. So if I can’t do this, my
child will go in hunger. INTERVIEWER: Right. WOMAN 1: I will not
just [INAUDIBLE] depend on [INAUDIBLE]. Sometimes cassava will
come or sometimes it will not come at all. If it comes [INAUDIBLE],,
everything I have to contribute towards
the food in the [INAUDIBLE].. But now, as I see it,
[INAUDIBLE] my children are eating too much
from what I grow. And the animal at risk. INTERVIEWER: So the– WOMAN 1: [INAUDIBLE] to
also help my house more. To fortress my house
more [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: Some women
may say that if I’m doing this, [INAUDIBLE]
for the other men to do. What will you tell them? WOMAN 1: I’ve all ready
started telling them, don’t depend on
men for everything. Because you are a woman,
you are not decoration. You are not there as decoration. You’re there to contribute,
towards your children and group. So if you can’t do
this, your husband will not look at you funny. Because if your
husband [INAUDIBLE],, be able to carry at least
some responsibility. INTERVIEWER: So the cassava,
you have different varieties? WOMAN 1: Different,
different varieties. [INAUDIBLE] you, I can
just [INAUDIBLE] cassava are river, [INAUDIBLE]
enormous there. Can you see some? INTERVIEWER: So the cassava
is not the tree [INAUDIBLE]?? WOMAN 1: No, you can
look at the vegetation. It [INAUDIBLE]
vegetation, the leaves. They are [INAUDIBLE]
of the leaves. The [INAUDIBLE] of the
leaves, you can look at them, [INAUDIBLE] feel. INTERVIEWER: Right. WOMAN 1: [INAUDIBLE]. You can just compare these two. Can you see any
difference from there and know that they
are of different kind? INTERVIEWER: This
one [INAUDIBLE],, this one is [INAUDIBLE]. WOMAN 1: And besides [INAUDIBLE]
what are we experience? What do you look at– INTERVIEWER: Also this– WOMAN 1: Your coloring– INTERVIEWER: Yeah. WOMAN 1: You’re looking
at the coloring. OK, then you also look at this. Are they the same? INTERVIEWER: No. Yeah, WOMAN 1: Not the same. As we walk further in,
it’s different, different [INAUDIBLE] cassava [INAUDIBLE]. I have the [INAUDIBLE],,
the one you just had there. You put it on [INAUDIBLE]
so they don’t fall. [INAUDIBLE] if you
go, you see it. So I have– INTERVIEWER: So how–
is there a main hectare? WOMAN 1: I have now two acres. I have 1 hectare,
[INAUDIBLE],, 5 hectares, yeah. INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 1: So in fact I have 1.5. INTERVIEWER: So can we
go on the other side? WOMAN 1: Yes. INTERVIEWER: So we are at
the cassava side, right? There’s the cassava farm? MRS. MIATTA SLOCUM: Yes. INTERVIEWER: OK, so how– MRS. SLOCUM: This is a
[INAUDIBLE] cassava farm. INTERVIEWER: OK, so
how it’s been like? Tell us exactly
because cassava farm, what do you feel is so
important to your agriculture activities, cassava? MRS. SLOCUM: In Liberia,
we have so many of food, like rice and cassava. Cassava can be
tend to many ways. You see the [INAUDIBLE],,
you plant the fennel. The fennel will make
the plant [INAUDIBLE].. But we crack the [INAUDIBLE]. We use the branches,
[INAUDIBLE],, so we use many things. So the rice too. In Liberia, when you eat any
food, you don’t eat rice, you will say you’re not eating. So the cassava. Cassava we eat the
leaf, we eat the root. And the root, we eat it raw. And you boil the cassava,
that’s how we eat it. You can roast it, you eat it. Like you can make dombo, make
foo foo, and we make capri. And right now, we
get another agabi, they call super agabi
So the cassava– INTERVIEWER: So how does
super agabi look like? MRS. SLOCUM: Oh, the coconut–
you mix it with coconut, and the [INAUDIBLE],,
it’s so sweet. So, I mean, cassava– I tried to say–
is cassava it can be [INAUDIBLE] in many ways. It can be [INAUDIBLE] in many
ways to be a food in Africa. So this is why you see–
any farmer you see, they got to get cassava. WOMAN 1: [INAUDIBLE]. INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 1: And then farmer,
if come around and need, they ask me, I [INAUDIBLE]
give it to farmers free. Because I want to motivate them. I want them to be like me. The problem there,
like, sometimes people will come here and
see and standing when they see me working. They’re all [INAUDIBLE],,
you have so [INAUDIBLE],, so you’re supposed to fear
people to do it their way, not supposed to do it. If I fear people to do
all the work I have, what would I take
home to my family? And then, if I fear
people to do the work, how would I motivate farmers? Because somebody would
let one time [INAUDIBLE] to control a workshop
in [INAUDIBLE].. From there we came
here to do [INAUDIBLE].. And then we have that other
workshop with [INAUDIBLE] group was there. And the kids will look
at it, see it, say what? If a woman can get BSC
degree in agricultural and put her head in the world
[INAUDIBLE] they want more. And for me, is
that a motivation? Great motivation, for people
are saying [INAUDIBLE].. They can see me
in a [INAUDIBLE],, then they can go there. So I always tell people that the
people that I’m going to pay, they’re treated well. They are not different from me. INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 1: –I started buying
piglets from farmers. Yeah, and I started with pigs. So I bought some from
Monrovia, from [INAUDIBLE].. And then I bought
some from [INAUDIBLE].. So if you’re ever there, you
see different, different breeds of pig also. So I can grow one. INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 1: And do one now
[INAUDIBLE],, and we grow more. INTERVIEWER: All right. So we are going now to– WOMAN 1: Yeah. INTERVIEWER: Yeah. WOMAN 1: I’m
[INAUDIBLE] the pigs. Like, the pig lay here. [PIGS OINKING] They [INAUDIBLE] piglet. INTERVIEWER: If you want
[INAUDIBLE] pull it off. WOMAN 1: You scared? INTERVIEWER: Mm-mm. WOMAN 1: Ah-huh. The pigs lay here. [PIGLETS SQUEALING] Their mother here. They want their mother. Where [INAUDIBLE]? INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 1: Last [INAUDIBLE]
go there to [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: So do other
people get [INAUDIBLE]?? Or the other– WOMAN 1: I treat them. INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 1: And the
least [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: Mm? WOMAN 1: So for that,
I do a lot [INAUDIBLE].. It’s just for them,
they prefer to be dirty. INTERVIEWER: [LAUGHS] WOMAN 1: Like the way
they clean [INAUDIBLE],, clean all the [INAUDIBLE]
off, [INAUDIBLE].. [PIGLETS SQUEALING] [INAUDIBLE] Hey! Hey! Hey! Hey! Hey! Hey! Hey! [INAUDIBLE] [LAUGHTER] INTERVIEWER: [INAUDIBLE]. That one is big. WOMAN 1: Well, they [INAUDIBLE]. INTERVIEWER: Yeah. WOMAN 1: [INAUDIBLE]. [PIG SNORTING] WOMAN 2: Yeah, we are
a dream family here. [INAUDIBLE] you saw a dream
family as women group. But we have special [INAUDIBLE]
that [INAUDIBLE] cannot be bought. They can’t be
hired in the store, that [INAUDIBLE] would be had. But when we plant cassava
or plant [INAUDIBLE],, any plant that
you can take away, they’re going to take
it away and carry it. Because we get special
price that is sure, and we get special price
that you buy from us. We, the women, are inside
[INAUDIBLE] to [INAUDIBLE].. So now when somebody’s
pregnant, [INAUDIBLE] to carry the [INAUDIBLE]. Because I, [INAUDIBLE],, I
plant cassava, I plant rice. So now to [INAUDIBLE],, he
said, that the only way that I can do. If I [INAUDIBLE] dream
for me is any [INAUDIBLE] and you are in [INAUDIBLE]
help, that will [INAUDIBLE] to help ourselves
to do anything. Because [INAUDIBLE] we
have been suffering. And in [INAUDIBLE],,
again, in [INAUDIBLE],, we are trying [INAUDIBLE]
family [INAUDIBLE].. WOMAN 3: Farmer! ALL: Feed the nation! INTERVIEWER: Right. WOMAN 4: [INAUDIBLE] INTERVIEWER: [INAUDIBLE] WOMAN 4: Yes. INTERVIEWER: Yeah,
tell us now, what are you doing to survive here? Are you part of the women group? WOMAN 4: Yes, I pick cassava
leaves, [INAUDIBLE] survive. What’s [INAUDIBLE] war. So I say, [INAUDIBLE]
help [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: Is that–
during the Ebola war, [INAUDIBLE] Ebola case, is
that what you’re talking about? WOMAN 4: Ebola case. [INAUDIBLE] war. INTERVIEWER: So after the
Ebola now, [INAUDIBLE] case, in farming– the farmer– the farmer
are [INAUDIBLE] doing. Yes, so how the farming now? Is it improving? WOMAN 4: Yeah, [INAUDIBLE],,
it all depends. And they’re [INAUDIBLE],,
want to go [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: Right. So why it take a
big downfall for you to improve your opportunities? WOMAN 4: One, [INAUDIBLE]
money, grants. INTERVIEWER: [INAUDIBLE]
to help your money? WOMAN 4: Yes. INTERVIEWER: So if you didn’t
have your money, it will– what [INAUDIBLE] do you
need for you to come so they can have and make a farm? WOMAN 4: $2,400 U.S. INTERVIEWER: It will be
the best way for you? WOMAN 4: Yes. INTERVIEWER: Ah, OK. So by how many here? All right, so let me
talk with this lady. How is your name? WOMAN 5: [INAUDIBLE] INTERVIEWER: Yeah, so– WOMAN 3: [INAUDIBLE]! ALL: [INAUDIBLE]! WOMAN 3: [INAUDIBLE]! ALL: [INAUDIBLE]! INTERVIEWER: OK, so
tell us now your name. WOMAN 5: Yes, my
name’s [INAUDIBLE].. Special women’s [INAUDIBLE]
we share in suffering. We won’t we not get
no hospital yet. Then one time, my other
friend, she was in [INAUDIBLE].. We have to hustle. [INAUDIBLE] One other woman
came here for food. So [INAUDIBLE] after, she
said that [INAUDIBLE].. When they [INAUDIBLE],,
there was no way. The baby not even make it. So we need hospital. One for the people to come,
they can help [INAUDIBLE].. And one for NGO to help
[INAUDIBLE] for [INAUDIBLE] to go [INAUDIBLE]. Now for our, [INAUDIBLE]
one step there to go, one step there to come. [INAUDIBLE] all the medicine. They’re going to say,
you have to go buy it. And we not get money
to buy that one. So we want [INAUDIBLE]. Asking the NGO to please
clean it for us, [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: Right, OK, so– WOMAN 3: [INAUDIBLE]! ALL: [INAUDIBLE]! INTERVIEWER: OK, so now
you’re doing farming, right? WOMAN 5: Yes. INTERVIEWER: You’re part of the
group that’s doing the farming? WOMAN 5: Yes. INTERVIEWER: So how long have
you been doing the farming? [INAUDIBLE] Ebola [INAUDIBLE],,
after Ebola disease, I mean, the outbreak now,
you’ve been using the farming. How the farming look like it is? Ah, how– WOMAN 5: The
farming [INAUDIBLE].. Because we can get
money to buy, sometimes. The town get [INAUDIBLE] for us. They instead to come to
[INAUDIBLE] because no money. Yeah, no money can be there. So [INAUDIBLE] you
can’t count on food. INTERVIEWER: OK. WOMAN 5: So we asking
them to come and help us. INTERVIEWER: So you feel now the
[INAUDIBLE] can help you to– but, [INAUDIBLE],, what
are some of the things that you really need from them? WOMAN 5: To come and help? INTERVIEWER: Mm-hmm. WOMAN 5: The thing I need,
[INAUDIBLE] clean [INAUDIBLE].. INTERVIEWER: Yeah, besides they
cleaned it now to make farm. WOMAN 5: Yeah. INTERVIEWER: The
agriculture, what are some of the things you need? Who you need? WOMAN 5: We need
[INAUDIBLE],, we need money. [INAUDIBLE] INTERVIEWER: Yeah,
new [INAUDIBLE].. WOMAN 5: Yeah, [INAUDIBLE], yes. INTERVIEWER: So you feel now
when some of those things are provided, it will help you? WOMAN 5: Yes. MRS. SLOCUM: My
real women speak! ALL: [INAUDIBLE]! MRS. SLOCUM:
[NON-ENGLISH CHANTING] ALL: [NON-ENGLISH CHANTING] MRS. SLOCUM: [INAUDIBLE]! ALL: [INAUDIBLE]! MRS. SLOCUM: [INAUDIBLE]! ALL: [INAUDIBLE]! MRS. SLOCUM: Farmers! ALL: Feed the nation! MRS. SLOCUM: Farmers! ALL: Feed the nation! MRS. SLOCUM: Farmers! ALL: Feed the nation! [MUSIC PLAYING]

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