Son-D-Farms

Son-D-Farms


My cousin, he kept saying, “You can’t do that. You can’t put five boys together.” “Two boys don’t get along.” I says, “As long as they obey God, and are
walking with the Lord, it will work.” Okay, I’m the oldest child of seven, and my
mother and dad, my first memory is of her carrying me in the house and she said, “Oh,
this is our new house.” And no running water, I don’t know if we even
had electricity, but we moved into it. And sitting right in the front door, you walked
in, and that was our bathroom, our washroom and our kitchen. We didn’t care. We had a house. That’s all we wanted, was a house and a barn. We’re “Oops” and “Whoops.” “Oops” and “Whoops!” (laughter) They had seven kids, he’s “Oops” and I’m “Whoops.” My husband always said, “I can’t start out
five boys farming.” Well I said, “Well, just try!” Growing up with the five of us brothers, I
mean everybody had their niche in what they were good at and their talents. We were all raised, “You don’t make no money
in the house.” You always said, “You don’t make any money
in the house.” You know, you only make money out working. Doug was the oldest. He was hurt in a horse accident in ’79. Looking back, you know, in a way, it was a
blessing to the family. We were always outside working. You need somebody
just staying in the house, watching the financials. Just making decisions. It forced Doug to stay in the house and just
manage the business. Then the turn came in the late ’70’s and early
’80’s and ground prices went down. So the brothers and myself started buying
some ground. We never paid ourselves much, we just kept
putting our profits back into our farming operation. I would’ve never believed that we would’ve
grown like we did. We started out with a few sows, and now we’ve
grown to basically 10,000 sows and we market 250,000 pigs annually. And the fun part is, you know, we’ve employed
some good people. We’ve got 100 employees, and you know, we couldn’t
do this without such good people. The new generation is coming in. I think being part of the next generation
is intimidating. We have some big shoes to fill. (laughter) You know, I feel like they were patient and
took the right opportunity and knew what the right opportunity would look like. And so, what if we don’t know what the right
opportunities look like in the future? But, it’s exciting! Yeah! (laughter) I see the future of the equipment getting
more technology savvy, like more apps. With technology, I mean, they know what these
pigs need, what they like, what they don’t like. And it’s just amazing what technology has
done to make pigs healthier than they’ve ever been. Our livelihood, how we live our life, all
comes from how well we take care of those pigs. If we’re not giving them as much care, as
much attention as we can, I mean, it affects my whole family, it affects
us, so they are next thing in line to our kids. I just wish Vernon was here. If he could see it now, oh! It makes me feel good! I’m so honored. But, I’m thankful. I’m thankful. It’s beyond my fondest dreams. It’s just beyond my fondest dreams. (music)

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