NMT Helps Reveal: How Crops Cope with Cold Stress

NMT Helps Reveal: How Crops Cope with Cold Stress


Hello everyone, today I’d like to give you a real world
example of how NMT can be applied into scientific
research. As you know, rice is a very important crop. In fact, two-thirds of the world eats rice every single
day. And in many parts of China, the average person
eats rice 2 or 3 times a day. With such a high demand for this crop, the ability to
grow it in abundance is essential. But in it’s natural state, rice is very sensitive to cold
temperatures so farmers are limited as to where they can grow it. Since rice is a staple crop in many areas, scientists have been searching for a gene that can
be modified to allow rice to tolerate cooler temperatures. It is known that plant cellular adaptations to
temperature differences are dependent on specific molecular cellular
pathways. One of these pathways is calcium-mediated signal
transduction. Since NMT has been successfully used in fields
such as nutrition and salt resistance, scientists utilized this technology to examine
calcium fluxes in response to a cold shock in rice roots. As seen in figures 6A-C, NMT measurements show extracellular calcium
influx of live roots in various genetic backgrounds
when introduced to a cold shock. Figure 6A shows a significant influx of calcium in
Dongjin roots when exposed to the cold shock. In comparison, cold1-1 was more tolerant of the
shock and was not affected as strongly. In Figure 6B the highest calcium influx in response
to cold was the COLD1-japonica transgenic line. The smallest calcium influx occurred with the
COLD1-indica transgenic line. The wild-type ZH10 responded with a higher influx
than COLD1-indica but a lower influx than COLD1-japonica. Figure 6C shows that the Nipponbare japonica rice,
had a higher influx of calcium than indica 93-11. It also shows that the d1 mutant of RGA1 had a
lower influx of calcium than the wild-type Shiokari. Figure 6D shows the significantly different mean
maximal influxes of cold shock between cold1-1 or transgenic lines
and wild-type. With the application of NMT, scientists were able to confirm that the calcium was
coming from extracellular space. This information helped scientists to learn more about the gene that contributes
significantly to cold tolerance. About half of the world’s population depends on rice
as their staple diet. This makes it very important for this crop to be able
to grow as much as possible. With the help of NMT and other technologies, we
learned more about cold tolerance, which in turn potentially empowers the farmers to
grow more rice to feed more people in the world. If you are interested to see more examples or real
world applications of NMT please subscribe now or visit our website. Thank you for watching, see you later!

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