Native Plant Showcase| Volunteer Gardener

Native Plant Showcase| Volunteer Gardener


– [Troy Marden] Native plants
are always a hot topic in Tennessee, and I can’t
think of anywhere that there are hotter topic
than at Reflection Riding arboretum in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Here with John Evans who is
the nursery and horticulture manager here. And we’re gonna talk about some of these fabulous native plants that you all grow and display, and promote to the public. – Right. Yes, well we’ve got just a few of our many many things that we sell here. – Right.
– We cultivate a lot of things. We sell them. We also plant them around the property. – Uh huh. – This one, I’m sure, most people are familiar with, if you’re
a plant enthusiast, you know this plant. This is Butterflyeeed,
it’s a type of Milk Weed. It’s Ascepeas Tuberosa. When it’s blooming out in the field you will see a lot of
pollinators gathering around Butterflyweed.
– [Troy] Right. – [John] As well as the other Milkweeds, there are several species. And we carry those, as well. – [Troy] A lot of buzz
right now about Milkweeds because everybody’s
concerned about the monarch. – [John] That’s right, yes. – [Troy] And this is
not only in the case of the Orange Butterflyweed, a great pollen and nectar plant, but also the Milkweeds
serve as the larva plants for the monarch.
– [John] That’s correct. Yes. And we pay a lot of attention to fodder for larvae here
at Reflection Riding. And here are two other examples. This is Spice Bush. I just clipped this back. But, this isn’t very showy in and of itself. But, it’s critical to the
larva of the Spice Bush Swallowtail.
– [Troy] Right. – [John] They have to have
something in this genus to feed on.
– [Troy] Mm-hmm. – [John] And our local
is Lyndera Bonzoean. Spice Bush.
– [Troy] Right. – [John] We carry that. This is also very interesting. – [Troy] Uh huh.
– [John] This is a Dutchman’s Piper Pipevine. – [Troy] Right.
– [John] Aristolochia macrophylla is this species. We also carry Aristolochia (mumbling). This, the macrophylla, the big leaf. – [Troy] Right. – [John] Is better if
you’re at a higher elevation with cooler temperatures and conditions. If you’re down in the
valley where you’re baked in the heat, I would
go with the Tomentosa. – [Troy] Okay. – [John] So they both have their niche. – [Troy] Right.
– [John] And it is critical to the Spice, or not the Spice Bush, but the.
– [Troy] But the Pipevine swallowtail.
– [John] The Pipevine Swallowtail, yes.
– [Troy] Yeah. What are these little seedlings
coming up in this flat? – [John] I’m very excited about these. This is Tennessee ironweed,
and I collected the seeds last year, kept them in a refrigerator and I planted them just last week and they’re already coming
up like gangbusters. What’s interesting about
this particular plant, Tennessee ironweed, is
that it’s endemic to just this area.
– [Troy] Okay. – [John] There are a few
counties in Tennessee. A couple in northwest Georgia. Northeast Alabama. That’s it. That’s its entire world distribution. – [Troy] Wow.
– [John] And as far as I know we’ll be the first nursery to carry Tennessee ironweed. And I’m very excited
to be able to offer it. We can help ensure its
perpetuation in the wild simply by making more of them. – [Troy] Right. Speaking of saving species. – That’s a fun one there. – Yeah. – That’s Franklinea. Or the Franklin Tree. – Yeah. – It’s actually named
after Benjamin Franklin. John Bartram named it. It was discovered along the Altamaha River. – [Troy] Right.
– [John] In Georgia. They made a botanical trip down there where they collected some. They thought it was wonderful. They brought it back to Philadelphia. They propagated them and they kept them in the botanical garden there. They returned some years later and looked for more of them. They were gone. – [Troy] Mm-hmm. – [John] tHey’ve never been found again in the wild.
– [Troy] Right. So the only way that
you can get this plant is through cultivation. – [John] Yes. – [Troy] Through a place
like Reflection Riding or through a commercial nursery that is growing and propagating them, but the wild species
is essentially extinct. – [John] It’s extinct in the wild. – [Troy] Yes.
– [John] And it’s a perfect example of the role that botanical garden or even home gardeners can play is the preservation of species. A lot of times gardening and landscaping is guilty of eliminating species. (laughs) – [Troy] Yes, exactly. – [John] But we can also. – [Troy] Or become kind of a monoculture. – [John] Exactly.
– [Troy] Where you plant lots of mandena and burning bush and those kinds of things where we really can be much more diverse and actually help in preservation. – Right, exactly. – So, moving on. We mentioned pollinators a bit ago. And certainly, this is
a great pollinator plant to have out in the garden right now. – [John] It sure is. That’s the obligatory Purple coneflower. – [Troy] Right. – [John] You can find these in garden shops everywhere. They’re a very popular plant. Echinacea Purpurea It’s not only a great pollinator plant but when the seeds mature like Eastern goldfinches, they love, it’s like candy to them. – [Troy] Yeah, I know in my garden when those heads mature in the fall the goldfinches are just all over them. – [John] Just trips from the to the plant. – [Troy] Yeah.
– [John] Now less common you won’t find this nearly
as often with in garden shops is the pale Purple coneflower. It’s a different species. Echinacea Pallida. We like to carry several species. We also have Tennessee
coneflower, Echinacea Tennessee (mumbling). Another thing I would like
to mention, as an aside, you’ll notice the color
difference between these two plants, they’re both Echinacea Purpurea. But because we collect the seed ourselves you see the genetic variation. – [Troy] You’re always going
to have a little variation. – [John] Right.
– [Troy] Some may be deeper, some may be paler – [John] Right. And that’s a good thing. Is to have that genetic variation and to perpetuate that
in your garden setting. You can buy a cultiva and they’re all have rubber stamp copies of each other. – [Troy] Right. – [John] But you don’t get the
genetic variation in that way so that’s why we like to collect the seed. Lobella Cardinalis, the cardinal flower. Hummingbirds love this. – [Troy] Right.
– [John] When it’s in full bloom, these are
beautiful tubular flowers. Brilliant scarlet color. – [Troy] Uh huh.
– [John] And hummingbirds are just drawn to them, – [Troy] Of course.
– [John] Want to eat them like candy.
– [Troy] Right. And then Beebalm.
– [John] Beebalm. Also very popular with pollinators. Bees, obviously. But also butterflies and other pollinators. – [Troy] I know in my
garden, this seems to be a favorite of the Tiger Swallowtail. That beautiful yellow and black striped Swallowtail, I always seem to have those on the menarda. And on the summer flocks. This shrub is in bloom right now but the blooms are just really tiny little flowers. But what happens after this is finished? – [John] Well, you get
a beautiful clusters of very brilliantly colored purple berries. – [Troy] Right. – [John] And it’s called beauty berry. – [Troy] American beauty berry. – [John] American beauty
berry, there is a Japanese. – [Troy] Yeah.
– [John] But this is our Native American beauty berry. Interestingly enough there was a study just published by the University of Alabama. There are a lot of folk
remedies for things. – [Troy] Uh huh.
– [John] And some of them pan out, and some of them don’t. But the University of Alabama just demonstrated that the rem, this has been reputed to repel mosquitoes. – [Troy] Oh really? – [John] Right, so people have used it traditionally they’ve crushed up the leaves rubbed them on their arms and it’s supposed to keep mosquitoes away. – [Troy] Interesting. – [John] It turns out it’s true. – [Troy] And that’s
scientifically proven now. – [John] That’s been
scientifically proven now. – [Troy] Now I’m gonna
have to put beauty berry back in the garden. All right, we have one more plant sort of peeking over your shoulder here. That appears to be a coneflower of some kind. – It is a coneflower. This is the giant coneflower. – [Troy] Yeah, it’s as tall as we are. – [John] It’s as tall as we are and if it were in the
ground and well-established it would be taller than we are. – [Troy] All right. – [John] They’re pretty
cool, and of course butterflies love these they’re a real attraction for them. – So the nursery here
at Reflection Riding, is it just for the purposes of supplying the arboretum, or can people come here and make purchases for their own garden? – Oh of course, yes. We have, traditionally have had two big plant sales every year. – [Troy] Uh huh.
– The spring plant sale, and the fall plant sale. – [Troy] Right. – And those have been real events, I mean people come together for those sales and it’s an old tradition. – [Troy] Uh huh. – What we would like to do is start inviting people to come by any time.
– [Troy] Right. – During the growing season. Shop around. Take a look. We won’t, we won’t turn you away. We’ll sell you some plants, if you like. – [Troy] Excellent. And so this really has now
been become a place where people in and around
Chattanooga and beyond, if you’re passing through
the area or coming to visit for the day and you want to add native plants to your garden
you can find them here. – [John] Right. – [Voiceover] For inspiring garden tours, growing tips, and garden projects visit our website at VolunteerGardener.org. Or on YouTube at the VolunteerGardener channel. And like us on Facebook.

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