Let’s Talk! Extension Fire Resistant Landscaping with Dan Schroder

Let’s Talk! Extension Fire Resistant Landscaping with Dan Schroder


Hi! I’m Dan Schroder, Colorado State
University Extension agent in Natural Resources in Summit County. On this
episode of Let’s Talk! Extension, we’re going to explore fire-resistant
landscaping. [Music.] Colorado’s a national jem, and many people have found it and have decided to make it their home. When people move into the mountainous areas
they’re literally living in the wildland-urban interface, or if their
home is in the forest it’s in the intermix. When people move to the forest
they need to be cognizant of the landscaping that they put around their
homes in order to be aware of wildfire, and the potential that trees and other
plantings that are placed too close to the home could cause a wildfire problem
in the future. Vegetative clearance around the house called ‘defensible space’
is a primary determinant of a home’s ability to survive wildfire. Defensible
space is simply put, room for firefighters to do their job. People often resist creating defensible
space because they believe it will be unattractive, unnatural, and sterile
looking. It doesn’t have to be! Wise landowners carefully plant landscaping
within the defensible space.This effort yields a many-fold return of beauty,
enjoyment, and added property value. Consider the following when planning the
fire wise landscape within your home’s defensible space. Follow defensible space
guidelines for zones 1, 2, & 3. Rlant in small, irregular clusters or islands
avoiding planting large masses. Use decorative, rock, gravel, and stepping
stone pathways to break up the continuity of the vegetation and fuel.
Incorporate a diversity of plant types and species in your landscape. Provide
supplemental water to plants close to your home and be creative. Wildflower
beds give a softer, more natural appearance to the otherwise manicured
look often resulting from defensible space development. If you use shrubs be
sure to place them away from the structure or trees as they can act as
ladder fuels for fire to creep into the canopy. When planting trees do not plant
the near the structure leave plenty of room between trees to allow for growth.
Think about creating a park-like environment, where there are spaces in
the canopy. After trees grow, or are established, prune the lowest branches.
Your forested landscape is a dynamic system. The trees that you plants around
your home need maintenance and care over long-term. It’s important that you make
sure to mow your grasses, and clear out any debris that could build up to ensure
that your home is wildfire safe. Thanks for watching, and make sure to check out
the website for more information [Music.]

One thought on “Let’s Talk! Extension Fire Resistant Landscaping with Dan Schroder

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *