Common Dripline Design Layouts

Common Dripline Design Layouts


One of the best ways to irrigate areas where
plantings are closely spaced together is to use dripline. Dripline is simply drip irrigation
tubing with emitters pre-installed within the tubing during the extrusion process. Available
in different emitter spacings and water output volumes, dripline is perfect for irrigating
flower beds, ground cover, hedges, vegetable gardens and is also great for trees. As with traditional sprinkler irrigation systems,
when creating your design, it’s important to keep efficiency in mind. Understanding
the product that you are working with and the best way to install it will help prevent
errors in design that may lead to low flow or pressure situations, and ultimately dead
plants. In this video we’ll cover some of the more
common dripline applications and layouts. The dripline we will use for reference is
the 17MM EZ-ID CV Dripline from Landscape Products. For smaller applications, a ¼-inch
version is also available. In Each scenario there is one point of connection that includes
a Drip Zone Kit consisting of a valve, filter and pressure regulator. The first design is the end fed layout and
is typical to flower beds, gardens and ground cover installations. The tubing is laid out
in rows with the inlet from the supply line on one end of the layout. A header row of larger diameter tubing or
PVC is used to maximize flow and pressure to the zone to ensure that each emitter is
operating properly. A flush point located at the opposite side of the zone kit allows
debris to be purged from the system after initial installation and during maintenance
checkups. Similar to the end fed layout is the center
f ed design. The difference is the zone is divided into two sections by the header row
forming a continuous loop. A flush point is located in each section on opposite sides
of the header row. The shape of the area you wish to irrigate, usually dictates if the
end fed or center fed layout is best suited for the situation. The center fed design also
allows for larger zones and longer runs. The next common design layout applies to trees.
Rather than using a bubbler that essentially floods the base of the tree, you can use dripline
to create concentric circles that expand outward from the base, following the roots to the
edge of the canopy. This ensures that the tree’s entire root system receives water,
rather than just the area close to the trunk. This is especially important for newly planted
trees. The outer rings will encourage the roots to seek out the water resulting in a
stronger, deeper root system. As the tree grows, you will eventually want to remove
the inner ring to prevent it from deforming and choking the tree. This layout can be used
to irrigate a single tree or a group of trees. Finally, the single run, E-ZEE layout is ideal
for smaller drip zones and is useful in linear, narrow runs and odd shaped areas. This could
include hedgerows, groundcover beds or vegetable gardens. It’s the simplest of the designs
since it does not require extra fittings or a header row. Additional dripline design layouts including
parking islands, sloped grades and more can be found at landscapeproductsinc.com in the
design resource section. If you’d like more information about drip irrigation or other
landscape and irrigation products, stop into your local Ewing branch or visit us online
at ewingirrigation.com.

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